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Period Paper -- Your source for vintage art & ads
 
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classic cadillac advertisement
white rock beverages vintage advertisement
White Rock
According to a legend from the Potawatomi tribe, the White Rock natural spring in Waukesha, Wisconsin held medicinal powers. Hoping to capitalize on the legend, H. M. Colver, a pharmacist, purchased the spring in 1871 and built a pavilion for vacationers and health seekers. Within five years, he was bottling the water and distributing it across the country. By the 1890s, White Rock had become the largest seller of sparkling table water. Psyche, the company’s trademark, was discovered at the 1893 Chicago World’s Fair after a painting by Paul Thumann. Colver purchased the rights to the image and adopted the creature as the company’s logo. White Rock was the first company to display the modern red and white Santa in advertisements, an honor often attributed to Coca-Cola.
pabst blue ribbon advertisement
Pabst Blue Ribbon
Pabst Blue Ribbon, known frequently as "PBR," was initially called "Pabst Select." The beer won a blue ribbon at the 1893 Chicago World’s Fair for being “America’s Best.” The award was then incorporated into the beer’s logo, and was soon referred to as the blue ribbon beer by loyal consumers. The name was officially changed to represent the common vernacular.
gold dust advertisement
Gold Dust
Gold Dust Washing Powder, a product of the N. K. Fairbank Company was first introduced around 1889. Prior to this product, laundry was done with a bar of soap and a washboard. The company’s popular mascots, the Gold Dust Twins, named Goldie and Dustie, were created by E. W. Kemble and displayed on the packaging of the product. “Let the Twins Do Your Work” was a popular, though racist, slogan often coupled with the trademark.
ivory soap advertisement
Ivory Soap
In 1878, James Gamble purchased a soap formula from a competitor in hopes of breaking into the Castile soap market. After refining the recipe, Gamble began selling under the name “White Soap.” According to legend, in 1879, an employee at the factory accidentally left his soap-mixing machine on while he was on a lunch break. This caused an excess amount of air to be mixed into the soap. When the manager decided the soap had not been detrimentally compromised, the shipment was sent. Weeks later, Procter and Gamble received an influx of orders requesting more of the “floating soap.” In 1879, Harley T. Proctor, son of cofounder of Procter and Gamble, changed the name of the soap from “White Soap” to “Ivory Soap” when he was inspired by a bible reading (Psalms 45:8) during church, which incorporated the term “Ivory” into the text.
cream of wheat advertisement
Cream of Wheat
Making its debut to the world at the 1893 Chicago World’s Fair, Cream of Wheat has been a popular brand throughout the 20th century. The mascot to the brand, Rastus, came into existence in 1890 and was first drawn by Emery Mapes. It is thought that a Chicago chef by the name of Frank L. Wright was the model for the character. Rastus can still be seen on Cream of Wheat boxes today with only slight modifications from the original version.
smith and wesson advertisement
Smith & Wesson
In 1856, four years after its founding, Smith and Wesson came out with a revolver that would fire the previously patented Rimfire cartridge. The revolver became the first successfully self-contained cartridge revolver in the world. Realizing the uniqueness of the firearm, the company quickly patented the revolver; thus making them a very young and very lucrative company. However, upon the impending patent expiration, the business realized it must manufacture a new revolutionary advancement in the firearm industry in order to maintain and increase the company’s profitability, and so the Model 3 American was born. This particular handgun was the first large caliber cartridge revolver, and the United States Calvary and the Russian Imperial Government quickly scooped up scores of the firearm. Such innovations quickly spawned Smith & Wesson as a world leader in handgun production. The company remains the largest handgun manufacturer in the United States, and its guns have become a standard for police and armed forces throughout the world.
postum advertisement
Postum
Postum was created in 1895 by C. W. Post of Battle Creek, Michigan. The beverage was marketed as a coffee substitute, and effectively dismayed consumers from purchasing the caffeinated beverage by claiming it made customers less intelligent and weak. One comical 1904 advertisement reads, “Because, with most people, coffee weakens the heart, inflames the spinal cord, and arrests the digestion of food, by partially petrifying it in the stomach as alcohol would in a specimen jar.” However negative the aftermath of coffee consumption, Post’s barrage did not stop himself from drinking it. During the coffee rationing of World War II, Postum saw a rise in sales when American citizens sought out a coffee substitute.